economics

State capitalism in Russia - Murray Bookchin

Murray Bookchin

Murray Bookchin's critique of the USSR's economy as state capitalist. Published in Contemporary Issues 7, Autumn 1950 (under pseudonym M. S. Shiloh).

State capitalism: the wages system under new management - Adam Buick & John Crump

Adam Buick and John Crump's book critiquing the post-revolutionary Russian and Chinese economies as state capitalist.

On the construction of socialism - Nikolai Osinsky (Valerian V. Obolensky)

In this text first published in the journal of the Bolshevik left communists, The Communist, in April 1918, Osinsky attacks Lenin’s economic policies (which he attributes to Lenin’s erroneous support for the Brest-Litovsk Peace Treaty) from a “left” perspective that champions working class supremacy in the “organization of production” (in the economic councils, etc.), advocates a policy of rigorous nationalization and promotion of “heavy industry” (coal, steel, railroads), and concludes that economic reconstruction cannot be directed towards Russian “self-sufficiency”, but must be oriented towards the goal of the victory of the international proletarian revolution.

The same, only in a different way - Gabriel Miasnikov

In this essay written in 1920, the Bolshevik left communist Gabriel Miasnikov examines the limitations of the Russian trade unions in the context of what he perceived to be the economic and political supremacy of the soviet institutions, but concludes that the trade unions must be preserved for purposes of domestic public relations (due to the habits of the Russian workers) and international propaganda (due to the predominant concepts concerning revolution outside of Russia where soviet-type institutions do not exist or are quickly destroyed and revolution is conceived as a trade union affair) and therefore they must be given something to do to keep them busy.

Capital in the twenty-first century - Thomas Piketty

Thomas Piketty’s new book, Capital in the 21st Century, painstakingly details the dynamics of wealth and income inequality throughout the last two centuries, and offers a somewhat grim picture of the future of economic inequality. Reproduced for reference, as we disagree with its conclusions.

Genesis and we

Supply and demand. What comes first? The issue story is primary, not a primitive response like: "If the society needs, we produce» or «We consume because we have that opportunity»

Towards a theory of the development of the world market and the world economy - Isaak Dashkovskij

The first of three articles. Under the Banner of Marxism, 1927, no.1 , 86-117. See part two and three.

How socialism can organise production without money - Adam Buick and Pieter Lawrence

A pair of interesting articles arguing the necessity of communism being a moneyless society, and outlining how parts of it could function.

Why we don't need money - Socialist Party of Great Britain

The SPGB respond to free market capitalist critics of socialism and explain how money is unnecessary.

The political economy of the West Bank 1967-1987: from peripheralisation to development - Adel Samara

An Israeli soldier watches Palestinians flee to Jordan from the West Bank, 1967.

Discussion on the general features of the political economy of the West Bank from 1967 to 1987 and how the Israeli state has both destroyed and transformed it.