unemployment

22M: Madrid Protests on March 22, 2014

Clashes broke out as hundreds of thousands converged in the Spanish capital for a “March of Dignity” against austerity and the right-wing government.

Over 100 people were injured and at least two dozen arrested after clashes broke out following an anti-austerity rally in Madrid last night. Arriving in six columns from all over the country (many of them on foot), hundreds of thousands of protesters converged upon the Spanish capital as part of a nationwide “March of Dignity”.

Bosnia and Herzegovina in spring - Global Uprisings documentary

Short documentary telling the story of the uprising in Bosnia and Herzegovina that started in early February 2014. It is the latest in the Global Uprisings film series. View the full series at www.globaluprisings.org

Diverse flags, four demands on the march to Madrid

Map showing routes and start dates of the six columns marching to Madrid

25th of February. 5 people set out walking from Barcelona. A few days later on 28th February, another 500 start walking from Iruñea and 216 more are marching in Asturíes. They've been the first to start the journey that will converge in Madrid this Saturday the 22nd of March.

The Marches for Dignity started to be organised in September and since then around 150 groups have formed statewide, according to Susana, member of the Marches for Dignity's communications committee in Madrid. In total 6 columns with people from all regions represented will enter Madrid via the state highways and they will join 1000s of people arriving that morning by coach and car.

More Business As Usual with Paul Mattick

The following interview was conducted in December 2013 at Paul Mattick Jr’s home in Brooklyn, NY. Paul Mattick Jr. (born 1944) is a Marxist theorist and philosopher. This is the third in a series of interviews conducted with participants from the Global Uprisings conference, that occurred during the weekend of November 15-17th, 2013. View more videos online at www.globaluprisings.org.

The transcript of this interview was done by Nick Terpolilli.

Self-organised claimant resistance to Atos: a success story for our time

French IT firm Atos announce they will pull out of the controversial Work Capacity Assement program after a national campaign self-organised by claimants which even saw workers at the company show their support.

This week saw an important and encouraging development in the ongoing resistance to welfare reforms and austerity: [url=http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/benefits-uk-testing-firm-atos-3168142]a national day of action, largely organised by claimants themselves with little input from any larger permanent organisation, was successful in provoking Atos, the unpopular “healthcare” company that asses

“What was all the fuss about?” My recent experiences of unemployment

One libcom poster's account of a spell of unemployment, and having to jump through the bureaucratic and pointless hoops of the welfare system.

Over the past two years I’ve walked out of three fairly ‘respectable’ (as my JC+ advisor put it) jobs because I couldn’t cope with the constant bullshit I was expected to produce, promote and deal with. I left these jobs feeling on the verge of having a serious mental health breakdown, taking some time to recover from work, and then finding a new job.

1932: the Ford Hunger March massacre

Pictures from the 1932 Ford Hunger March massacre in Detroit, where police and Ford security guards killed 4 and injured 60 when they opened fire on a demonstration organized by the Communist Party USA's Unemployed Council. Originally posted at the Walter P. Reuther Library.

Decent wages and decent capitalism?

Decent wages and decent capitalism?

Ha-Joon Chang argues that higher wages are good for workers and businesses alike. He's wrong.

Ha-Joon Chang is a leading heterodox development economist. He is probably best known for his 2002 book 'Kicking away the ladder', which convincingly demolishes free market development myths. Chang shows that the countries which successfully industrialised in the 20th century were those which pursued activist state development policies.

Beyond Thatcher : militant testimonies on miners’ struggles and British syndicalism from yesterday and today

This year, Margaret Thatcher’s death reminded us of the economic policies she initiated in Britain and her anti-social and anti-union fights. In the last months, Autre Futur [French syndicalist website and association] wished to go further and to conduct a series of interviews with different British unionists and syndicalists, about these past struggles but also about the present, in order to get a better grasp of issues which have emerged in recent decades.

The relevance of these testimonies and thoughts have been shown to go beyond the British context and remind us the importance of a greater international cooperation and solidarity in the face of life and working conditions’ deterioration.

The Socialist Party have no right to demand one way solidarity from claimants

Following a debate on Twitter, several statements appeared online seeking to defend the PCS union over its position on welfare reform and sanctions. This is a response, particularly aimed at PCS Vice President John McInally’s piece for the Socialist Party.

In writing this I am “helping the Tories,” if the nonsense aimed at Boycott Workfare of late is anything to go by. They raised the question of PCS members in the Department for Work and Pensions refusing to sanction claimants, which is apparently highly divisive and has the government rubbing their hands with glee.